The Do’s and Don’ts of Drones

Teresa Olson
By Teresa Olson September 6, 2017 11:18 Updated

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There may be a good number of you folks who’ve crossed over into the realm of drones, and Andrew Soucek of Botlink has some valuable tips for making sure you start off on the right foot.  Here’s a quick recap:

  • In the U.S. as of May 2017, registering with the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) is no longer required if you’re simply flying drones as a hobby.  But if you intend to use your drone with the intent of making a profit, you will  need to register with the FAA and also obtain a Part 107 unmanned pilot’s license.  You must also be 16 years old at a minimum, and must pass TSA vetting.
  • Make sure your drone is flying a minimum of five miles from airports unless you have let them know you’ll be in the area.  You must of course not interfere with any manned aircraft, giving them right of way.  Failure to do so could mean legal action against you by the FAA.  If you’re not sure about nearby airports, check websites such as knowbeforeyoufly.org or by using the app AirMap.
  • You must always be able to see your drone without the use of binoculars or other tools that would enhance your vision.  Have a spotter with you and don’t fly behind objects that would impair your field of vision for even a moment.
  • The FAA recommends not flying higher than 400 feet which will keep you a safe distance away from manned aircraft.
  • Make sure you have fair weather.  Rain, snow, and high winds can create problems.
  • Get a permit before flying in a National Park or you’ll suffer the consequences of confiscated gear, fines or potential jail time.  This no-fly zone includes National Monuments, National Battlefields, and historic sites.
  • Start your flying experience in places without buildings or trees.  Once you’re comfortable with your drone you can move on to more challenging environments.

And last but not least – Use common sense.  Ensure the safety of yourself and those around you.  Don’t fly over people or vehicles, and stay away from government buildings and stadiums.

Botlink provides an end-to-end system designed to help people use drones to make their jobs easier.  Using the expertise of professionals can also be an essential piece to your drone experience.

-Terry Olson, Titan Outlet Store Team

Resources:

https://botlink-website-staging.herokuapp.com/blog/i-just-bought-a-drone-now-what-drone-rules-and-regulations?platform=hootsuite

 

Teresa Olson
By Teresa Olson September 6, 2017 11:18 Updated
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