Use Your Head to Protect It

Teresa Olson
By Teresa Olson January 22, 2018 17:27

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It’s football season!  And basketball season!  And hockey season!  The list goes on and our society’s obsession with sports seems to grow each and every day.  But this interest has recently included an increased awareness of injuries associated with those activities.  Concussions are at the top of the list – that trauma that occurs when your head or body is hit hard and your brain crashes into your skull.  A professional football player who currently struggles with health issues related to TBIs (Traumatic Brain Injury) is Jim McMahon.  Early onset dementia is the price he pays today for the activities of his past, and we can be thankful that things are changing for the better.

We often read of the causes for a concussion – fights, falls, playground injuries, car crashes, bike accidents and many sports.  But we don’t hear about the potential for this specifically happening to farmers.  According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.5 million people experience a TBI every year and an estimated 5.3 million Americans live with disabilities as a result of brain injuries.  Farmers are at a high risk for concussions because of falling, working with livestock, and maneuvering heavy tools and equipment.

So just as athletes practice safe practices and use specialized equipment, farmers should also take preventative steps to reduce their chances of suffering a brain injury:

  • Avoid working on equipment with loose parts or tools directly above your head.
  • Be aware of your surrounding, especially in low-light conditions, paying special attention to what’s beside and above you.
  • Maintain three points of contact (one hand/two feet, or two hands/one foot) when climbing or getting in and out of equipment.
  • Use proper handling techniques around aggressive or defensive livestock.
  • Use personal protective equipment including head protection when needed.

If something does happen, it’s also important to recognize and look for the symptoms of a TBI.  These symptoms fall into four major categories: 1. Thinking and remembering, 2. Physical, 3. Emotional and mood, and 4. Sleep.  Don’t ignore these signs and seek medical attention right away.  The best way to recover from a concussion is to rest your body and brain, and while you may feel well enough to go out and do those chores, another blow to the head before you’re completely healed can slow your recovery or increase the chance of long-term problems and brain damage.

Use your head so you can protect it.

-Terry Olson, Titan Outlet Store Team

References:

https://www.webmd.com/brain/tc/traumatic-brain-injury-concussion-overview#2

http://www.farmagain.com/braininjury.html

https://www.agriculture.com/family/health-safety/heads-up

 

Teresa Olson
By Teresa Olson January 22, 2018 17:27
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